Everyone enjoys a good mystery...

But not everyone gets to solve one!


Since 1985, we’ve presented interactive comedy-mysteries for companies, theatres, and other groups.  These were so successful  and popular that we made our scripts available to theatres, schools, and other mystery-lovers. To date, over 1,500 groups around the world have used Moushey scripts and production packages to produce their own mysteries.  Whether you want to present a mystery fund-raiser, dinner theatre production, special event, or ‘regular’ performance, you’ve come to the right place for scripts and production help.

 

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what is a moushey mystery?

Mysteries by Moushey are a combination game, party, and theatrical production.  Each event is as much comedy as mystery!  It begins as the audience enters and the actors, in character, circulate, establish relationships, and stage improvisational scenes — all of which “set up” the mystery that will unfold and that the audience will solve!  It's mystery, mirth, and mayhem!

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who Produces Mysteries? 

Theatres (community and professional) and high schools and colleges and organizations can get in on the mystery-comedy act.   In fact, ANY group that wants to present a fun interactive event or stage an unusual fundraiser can produce.  It helps to have someone with minimal theatre experience on board, but we have had folks with varied experience do our shows.     

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who is eileen moushey? 

Eileen Moushey is a freelance writer/director. Besides 3 decades of Comic Crime, Eileen has also written and directed many other projects including educational television series for a local PBS affiliate. Two of these garnered regional Emmy awards. Eileen and her husband, Stephen (aka The Shipping Guy) live in their "empty nest" (sniff) in Kent, Ohio.  


I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you for writing these fun pieces and for giving me this wonderful hobby that brings so much laughter and fun into my life and to the lives of the other performers and, of course, the audience.
— Pat Price, Oberlin High School